The Story behind a Boy Who Conquered Dyslexia One Horse and Dog Treat at a Time.

"What drives me most is my competitive nature, my persistence and my love for business and Horses.  Dyslexia has taught me never to give up and I have learned a lot about failure and the need to push forward through the hardest of times.  I think that's why I will conquer Dyslexia, because I look at it as the essence of who I am.  I have embraced it and I think Dyslexia is what makes me successful."

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72% of students with IEP's Drop Out of School. Dyslexia Needs A Plan.

Did you know that 72% of students in remedial classes drop out of school?

 

Some alarming facts parents must consider.  

*70-80% of people with poor reading skills are likely dyslexic.

*Dyslexia is the most common of the language based learning disabilities.

*According to the National Assessment of Educational Progress, (NAEP) 38% of all fourth grade students are “below basic” reading skills.  They are at or below the 40th percentile for their age group.

*Nationwide 20% of the elementary school population is struggling with reading.

*National center for Education statistics, 5% of all adults are “non-literate”

*62% of non readers dropped out of high school.

*80% of children with an IEP have reading difficulty and 85% of those are Dyslexic.

*30% of children with Dyslexia also have at least a mild form of AD/HD (Source: Learning Inside-Out.)

*The majority of students with IEP and no remediation strategies or support will drop out of college after the first year.

*It is a fact that the amount of jail cells built in America are based on reading level assessments.  If you are non-literate adult or juvenile, at second grade reading level or lower, the majority of that population will end in the penal system.  

With those facts, every parent who suspects a child has a language learning disability, needs to act and formulate a plan of action.  You will change the life of your child.

Most parents will invest over $20,000 over the course of educational years in tutors, and ineffective programs to help support children with Dyslexia and find no positive improvement.

Here are some tips for parents to beat the odds:

*Act Early.  Demand testing no later than 1st grade if you suspect your child is struggling.

*Outside Assessment:   Require a private speech and language report to assess your child’s educational needs.  This report is essential. It is the benchmark of your child’s issues and will help schools determine the right resources for your child.  A private assessment (outside of school) is necessary to assess or even diagnose Dyslexia with accuracy representing your child’s individual needs.  There are many teaching colleges that have a learning center on campus and will assess and offer free reports.

*Get Support.  Parents need guidance.  Most have no time, no resources, and no knowledge of the years of planning and accommodations that are required to help students succeed with Dyslexia.  Parents are the lifeline of children with Dyslexia. However, they are overwhelmed with information, advice from support groups help but there is no beginning and end direction and so parents remain ineffective. With no plan, there is very slow action and virtually no improvement.   Parents must be educated, coached or given the direction and support for their child’s individual needs. Parents must be organized, and clear with a direct path from unprepared to empowered.  Parents need direction and coaching.  The may require a representative to manage their child’s IEP meetings, review IEP’s and offer immediate strategies that successfully navigate the process of school management.  It is a job. 

*A Master Plan is the best investment you can make to beat the odds of the educational system for your child’s educational success.

*Successful Transitions require preparation: Students with Dyslexia demand preparation and specific foundations and guidance counseling for Dyslexia to successfully transfer from elementary to high school and again from high school to college.  Finding the right college is key.  It is a huge component and most Guidance Counselors in public schools are not trained for specific support for Dyslexic students.  Start the process two years prior to transition. Get help with a specialist who understands and can offer guidance specific to Dyslexia.   Parents must learn what is needed to give your child the foundations and skills necessary to graduate high school and college.

 

Prepare Now:   GET YOUR BONUS Consultation and Assessment Packet, our most effective tool to organize a plan,  absolutely free.  Subscribe Now To Receive.  

 http://www.themagnificentminds.com/parents-store

 

*Go From Unprepared to Empowered Parent: 

 

Our Bonus Assessment Packet - comes with one free individual skype consult.  It is a great tool and opportunity to ask questions, gain solutions and seek advice from an experienced resource specialist.  Find out what academic stage your child is in.  What important information you need to know.  And what resources can help. This free session and packet is filled with helpful strategies, offering six months of planning timelines free.  There is no further commitment.  

 

 Five Stages of Educational Success System offers a completed Master Plan of School Management for Dyslexic Minds. From Kindergarten to College.  

 

This is a $799.00 Value is now available as our special invitation for $299.00.  Offer Good Until October 31st.  

 

 http://www.themagnificentminds.com/parents-store

 

 

SLEEP INTERVENTIONS CAN REDUCE ADHD MEDICATIONS FOR KIDS.

 

In general, sleep deprivation is a problem among children in America. According to National Sleep Foundation's 2004 Sleep in America poll, more than two-thirds of children experience one or more sleep problems at least a few nights a week. For children with ADHD, poor sleep (too little sleep or symptoms of sleep disorders) may profoundly impact ADHD symptoms. In fact, one study found that treating sleep problems may be enough to eliminate attention and hyperactivity issues for some children. (Center sleepfoundation.org/sleep-disorders-problems/adhd-and-sleep)

Sleep problems in school children with ADHD are extremely common and strongly associated with brain function.  Relationships between mild and moderate or severe sleep problems relate back to ADHD. Studies show that moderate or severe sleep problems strongly predict symptom severity of ADHD. 

 

Studies also show that implementation of a sleep intervention could reduce the need for medication in some children.  

 

Children and adults behave differently as a result of sleepiness. Adults usually become sluggish when tired while children tend to overcompensate and speed up. For this reason, sleep deprivation is sometimes confused with ADHD in children. Children may also be moody, emotionally explosive, and/or aggressive as a result of sleepiness. In a study involving 2,463 children aged 6-15, children with sleep problems were more likely to be inattentive, hyperactive, impulsive, and display oppositional behaviors.

 

Sleep problems are also common in adults with ADHD. In one study, researchers compared adults with narcolepsy, idiopathic hypersomnia, and AHDH and found a high percentage of symptom overlap, suggesting the possibility of ADHD misdiagnosis among adults.

 

 

 

Doctors Issue Drugs Often at Parents' Request, but Experts Question Safety http://www.webmd.com/sleep-disorders/news/20030505/drugs-often-used-for-insomnia-in-kids#1 May 5, 2003

 

Providing children with drugs to help them fall asleep is common, according to a recent report -- and with no product specifically designed to treat insomnia min kids, pediatricians usually rely on antihistamines and other drugs that have sleep-producing side effects.

 

In fact, a study published in this month's issue of Pediatrics reveals that three in four pediatricians had recommended nonprescription medications for insomnia in kids in the six months prior to being surveyed, while half had written prescriptions for drugs that induce sleep.

 

And often, the survey shows, it's done for the rest or relief of the parents -- and at their request. Drugs were most often recommended or prescribed by 671 pediatricians surveyed to provide relief for weary parents -- especially in cases with children of special needs. Often the drugs were used in combination with behavioral management strategies. Other reasons in which medications were used included during travel or in children with pain.

 

"In a sense, we were surprised at how many pediatricians are recommending or prescribing drugs to treat insomnia in children -- especially for reasons like helping the child sleep while traveling," says study author Carol L. Rosen, MD, a pediatric sleep specialist at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. "But in another sense, we're not surprised because it's pediatricians who largely treat special-needs children with ADHD and autism, and sleep problems are a well-known problem in young patients with those conditions."

 

Still, she tells WebMD her study suggests that insomnia in kids is more widespread than believed, and because of that, specific guidelines are needed on how to treat it. 

 

Currently, there are no prescription sleep aids specifically designed to be used for insomnia in kids, so doctors must rely on other drugs that induce sleepiness. And medical associations such as the American Academy of Pediatrics have no policies or treatment guidelines.

 

"The medications we're using for children were never made to help children fall asleep; we're using them because of their side effects ... for their side effects," she tells WebMD. 

 

"What came out of our study is there is a real need for something specifically designed for children. There are a lot of drugs to help adults fall asleep that we know are safe and effective. But we have nothing for kids. And if we use an adult sleep aid, we don't know safe dosages." (http://www.webmd.com/add-adhd/childhood-adhd/features/reduce-side-effects-adhd-medications#1)

 

For many children, ADHD medications curb restlessness, impulsivity, and inattention well enough for them to flourish at home, school, and on the playground. But the drugs can also prompt common side effects, such as low appetite, stomach pain, or sleep problems. In rare and serious cases, they can cause heart problems, such as chest pain, liver problems, or suicidal thoughts.

 

“We do deal with both wonderful treatment response, but at the same time, medication-related side effects,” says Murat Pakyurek, an associate clinical professor at the University of California-Davis Medical Center department of psychiatry and the UC Davis M.I.N.D. Institute’s ADHD program. “The majority of the medication-related side effects are mild and temporary in nature. But there are a few side effects that are more severe and that need to be addressed immediately,” he says.

 

Set up a regular bedtime routine that includes relaxing activities, such as bathing or reading. If a stimulant type of ADHD medication prevents your child from sleeping well, ask the doctor about taking the drug earlier in the day or switching from a long-acting to a shorter-acting form . Ask, too, about reducing the dose or stopping the drug in the afternoon to help your child sleep atbedtime.

 

Daytime drowsiness: If the ADHD drug atomoxetine (Strattera) is making your child sleepy during the day, ask about giving the drug atbedtime instead of in the morning. You can also check with the doctor about lowering the dose or dividing the dose and giving it twice a day.

 

Rebounding effects: When ADHD drugs wear off in the afternoon or evening, some children have more ADHD symptoms or irritability. To prevent this “rebounding,” ask your child’s doctor about using a longer-lasting medication or taking a small dose of fast-acting stimulant later in the day.

 

 

 

20 Tips For Improving Sleep

Web MD, June 17, 2015 http://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/discomfort-15/better-sleep/slideshow-sleep-tips

 

1. Power Down

The soft blue glow from a cell phone, tablet, or digital clock on your bedside table may hurt your sleep.

Tip: Turn off TVs, computers, and other blue-light sources an hour before you go to bed. Cover any displays you can't shut off.

 

2. Nix Naps

You’ll rest better at night. But if you have to snooze while the sun's up, keep it to 20 minutes or less. Nap in the early part of the day.

Tip: Overcome an afternoon energy slump with a short walk, a glass of ice water, or a phone call with a friend.

 

3. Block Your Clock

Do you glance at it several times a night? That can make your mind race with thoughts about the day to come, which can keep you awake .

Tip: Put your alarm clock in a drawer, under your bed, or turn it away from view.

 

  1. Room Temperature - The Best Room temperature for sleep is 68-72 degrees

 

5. Put Your Neck in 'Neutral'

Blame your pillow if you wake up tired with a stiff neck. It should be just the right size -- not too fat and not too flat -- to support the natural curve of your neck when you're resting on your back. Do you sleep on your side? Line your nose up with the center of your body. Don’t snooze on your stomach. It twists your neck.

Tip: Use good posture before bed, too. Don't crane your neck to watch TV.

 

6. Allergies Contribute to lack of Sleep. Seal Your Mattress

Sneezes, sniffles, and itchiness from allergies can lead to lousy shut-eye. Your mattress may hold the cause. Over time, it can fill with mold, dust mite droppings, and other allergy triggers. Seal your mattress, box springs, and pillows to avoid them.

Tip: Air-tight, plastic, dust-proof covers work best.

Tip:  Room purifier to decrease allergies are effective.

 

7. Save Your Bed for Sleep

Your bedroom should feel relaxing. Don’t sit in bed and work, surf the Internet, or watch TV.

 

8. Set Your Body Clock

Go to sleep and wake up at roughly the same time every day, even on weekends. This routine will get your brain and body used to being on a healthy snooze-wake schedule. In time, you'll be able to nod off quickly and rest soundly through the night.

Tip: Get out in bright light for 5 to 30 minutes as soon as you get out of bed. Light tells your body to get going!

 

9. Look for Hidden Caffeine

Coffee in the morning is fine for most people. But as soon as the clock strikes noon, avoid caffeine in foods and drinks.  Even small amounts found in chocolate can affect your Zzzz's later that night.

Tip: Read labels. Some pain relievers and weight loss pills contain caffeine.

 

10. Work Out Wisely

Regular exercise helps you sleep better -- as long as you don’t get it in too close to bedtime. A post-workout burst of energy can keep you awake. Aim to finish any vigorous exercise 3 to 4 hours before you head to bed. 

Tip: Gentle mind-body exercises, like yoga or tai chi, are great to do just before you hit the sack.

 

11. Eat Right at Night

Don’t eat heavy foods and big meals too late. They overload your digestive system, which affects how well you sleep. Have a light evening snack of cereal with milk or crackers and cheese instead.

Tip: Finish eating at least an hour before bed.

 

12. Rethink Your Drink

Alcohol can make you sleepy at bedtime, but beware. After its initial effects wear off, it will make you wake up more often overnight.

Tip: Warm milk or chamomile tea are better choices.

 

13. Watch What Time You Sip

Want to lower your odds of needing nighttime trips to the bathroom? Don’t drink anything in the last 2 hours before bed. If you have to get up at night, it can be hard to get back to sleep quickly.

Tip: Keep a nightlight in the bathroom to minimize bright light.

 

14. Lower the Lights

Dim them around your home 2 to 3 hours before bedtime. Lower light levels signal your brain to make melatonin, the hormone that brings on sleep.

Tip: Use a 15-watt bulb if you read in the last hour before bed.

 

15. Hush Noise

Faucet drips, nearby traffic, or a loud dog can chip away at your sleep. And if you're a parent, you might be all too aware of noises at night long after your children have outgrown their cribs.

Tip: Use a fan, an air-conditioner, or a white noise app or machine. You can also try ear plugs.

 

17. Beds Are for People

A cat's or a dog's night moves can cut your sleep short. They can also bring allergy triggers like fleas, fur, dander, and pollen into your bed. 

Tip: Ask your vet or animal trainer how you can teach your pet to snooze happily in its own bed.

 

18. Free Your Mind

Put aside any work, touchy discussions, or complicated decisions 2 to 3 hours before bed. It takes time to turn off the "noise" of the day. If you’ve still got a lot on your mind, jot it down and let go for the night. Then, about an hour before you hit the sack, read something calming, meditate, listen to quiet music, or take a warm bath.

Tip: Even 10 minutes of relaxation makes a difference.

 

  1. Eating Habits: 

Certain foods promote better sleep.  Check at health food stores to include the best foods and natural supplements to help promote sleep.

 

20. Know When to See Your Doctor

If you suspect sleep problems are associated with learning difficulties or ADHD, consult a pediatrician who can check to see if a health condition -- such as acid reflux, arthritis, asthma, or depression -- or a medicine your child is taking is part of the problem.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FOOD TIPS FOR SLEEP:


Wild lettuce -If you've suffered anxiety, headaches, or muscle or joint pain, you might already be familiar with wild lettuce. It's also effective at calming restlessness and reducing anxiety—and may even quell restless legs syndrome. When using a wild-lettuce supplement, take 30 to 120 milligrams before bed. (Check dosage for children)

 

Hops

Beer fans will no doubt be familiar with the calming effect of hops, the female flowers used in beer making. For sleep purposes, though, this extract has been widely used as a mild sedative for anxiety and insomnia. Take 30 to 120 milligrams before climbing under the covers. (Children dosage differs)

 

Aromatherapy

Studies have proven effective results with Lavender.  Find a spray with real lavender and spritz on pillow

 

 

Melatonin

Melatonin is the hormone that controls sleep, so it's no wonder that it naturally induces sleep. Although some experts recommend taking higher doses, studies show that lower doses are more effective. Plus, there's concern that too-high doses could cause toxicity as well as raise the risk of depression or infertility. Take 0.3 to 0.5 milligrams before bed. (Children dosage differs)

 

 

 

 

SLEEP INTERVENTIONS CAN REDUCE ADHD MEDICATIONS FOR KIDS.

 

In general, sleep deprivation is a problem among children in America. According to National Sleep Foundation's 2004 Sleep in America poll, more than two-thirds of children experience one or more sleep problems at least a few nights a week. For children with ADHD, poor sleep (too little sleep or symptoms of sleep disorders) may profoundly impact ADHD symptoms. In fact, one study found that treating sleep problems may be enough to eliminate attention and hyperactivity issues for some children. (Center sleepfoundation.org/sleep-disorders-problems/adhd-and-sleep)

Sleep problems in school children with ADHD are extremely common and strongly associated with brain function.  Relationships between mild and moderate or severe sleep problems relate back to ADHD. Studies show that moderate or severe sleep problems strongly predict symptom severity of ADHD. 

 

Studies also show that implementation of a sleep intervention could reduce the need for medication in some children.  

 

Children and adults behave differently as a result of sleepiness. Adults usually become sluggish when tired while children tend to overcompensate and speed up. For this reason, sleep deprivation is sometimes confused with ADHD in children. Children may also be moody, emotionally explosive, and/or aggressive as a result of sleepiness. In a study involving 2,463 children aged 6-15, children with sleep problems were more likely to be inattentive, hyperactive, impulsive, and display oppositional behaviors.

 

Sleep problems are also common in adults with ADHD. In one study, researchers compared adults with narcolepsy, idiopathic hypersomnia, and AHDH and found a high percentage of symptom overlap, suggesting the possibility of ADHD misdiagnosis among adults.

 

 

 

Doctors Issue Drugs Often at Parents' Request, but Experts Question Safety http://www.webmd.com/sleep-disorders/news/20030505/drugs-often-used-for-insomnia-in-kids#1 May 5, 2003

 

Providing children with drugs to help them fall asleep is common, according to a recent report -- and with no product specifically designed to treat insomnia min kids, pediatricians usually rely on antihistamines and other drugs that have sleep-producing side effects.

 

In fact, a study published in this month's issue of Pediatrics reveals that three in four pediatricians had recommended nonprescription medications for insomnia in kids in the six months prior to being surveyed, while half had written prescriptions for drugs that induce sleep.

 

And often, the survey shows, it's done for the rest or relief of the parents -- and at their request. Drugs were most often recommended or prescribed by 671 pediatricians surveyed to provide relief for weary parents -- especially in cases with children of special needs. Often the drugs were used in combination with behavioral management strategies. Other reasons in which medications were used included during travel or in children with pain.

 

"In a sense, we were surprised at how many pediatricians are recommending or prescribing drugs to treat insomnia in children -- especially for reasons like helping the child sleep while traveling," says study author Carol L. Rosen, MD, a pediatric sleep specialist at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. "But in another sense, we're not surprised because it's pediatricians who largely treat special-needs children with ADHD and autism, and sleep problems are a well-known problem in young patients with those conditions."

 

Still, she tells WebMD her study suggests that insomnia in kids is more widespread than believed, and because of that, specific guidelines are needed on how to treat it. 

 

Currently, there are no prescription sleep aids specifically designed to be used for insomnia in kids, so doctors must rely on other drugs that induce sleepiness. And medical associations such as the American Academy of Pediatrics have no policies or treatment guidelines.

 

"The medications we're using for children were never made to help children fall asleep; we're using them because of their side effects ... for their side effects," she tells WebMD. 

 

"What came out of our study is there is a real need for something specifically designed for children. There are a lot of drugs to help adults fall asleep that we know are safe and effective. But we have nothing for kids. And if we use an adult sleep aid, we don't know safe dosages." (http://www.webmd.com/add-adhd/childhood-adhd/features/reduce-side-effects-adhd-medications#1)

 

For many children, ADHD medications curb restlessness, impulsivity, and inattention well enough for them to flourish at home, school, and on the playground. But the drugs can also prompt common side effects, such as low appetite, stomach pain, or sleep problems. In rare and serious cases, they can cause heart problems, such as chest pain, liver problems, or suicidal thoughts.

 

“We do deal with both wonderful treatment response, but at the same time, medication-related side effects,” says Murat Pakyurek, an associate clinical professor at the University of California-Davis Medical Center department of psychiatry and the UC Davis M.I.N.D. Institute’s ADHD program. “The majority of the medication-related side effects are mild and temporary in nature. But there are a few side effects that are more severe and that need to be addressed immediately,” he says.

 

Set up a regular bedtime routine that includes relaxing activities, such as bathing or reading. If a stimulant type of ADHD medication prevents your child from sleeping well, ask the doctor about taking the drug earlier in the day or switching from a long-acting to a shorter-acting form . Ask, too, about reducing the dose or stopping the drug in the afternoon to help your child sleep atbedtime.

 

Daytime drowsiness: If the ADHD drug atomoxetine (Strattera) is making your child sleepy during the day, ask about giving the drug atbedtime instead of in the morning. You can also check with the doctor about lowering the dose or dividing the dose and giving it twice a day.

 

Rebounding effects: When ADHD drugs wear off in the afternoon or evening, some children have more ADHD symptoms or irritability. To prevent this “rebounding,” ask your child’s doctor about using a longer-lasting medication or taking a small dose of fast-acting stimulant later in the day.

 

 

 

20 Tips For Improving Sleep

Web MD, June 17, 2015 http://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/discomfort-15/better-sleep/slideshow-sleep-tips

 

1. Power Down

The soft blue glow from a cell phone, tablet, or digital clock on your bedside table may hurt your sleep.

Tip: Turn off TVs, computers, and other blue-light sources an hour before you go to bed. Cover any displays you can't shut off.

 

2. Nix Naps

You’ll rest better at night. But if you have to snooze while the sun's up, keep it to 20 minutes or less. Nap in the early part of the day.

Tip: Overcome an afternoon energy slump with a short walk, a glass of ice water, or a phone call with a friend.

 

3. Block Your Clock

Do you glance at it several times a night? That can make your mind race with thoughts about the day to come, which can keep you awake .

Tip: Put your alarm clock in a drawer, under your bed, or turn it away from view.

 

  1. Room Temperature - The Best Room temperature for sleep is 68-72 degrees

 

5. Put Your Neck in 'Neutral'

Blame your pillow if you wake up tired with a stiff neck. It should be just the right size -- not too fat and not too flat -- to support the natural curve of your neck when you're resting on your back. Do you sleep on your side? Line your nose up with the center of your body. Don’t snooze on your stomach. It twists your neck.

Tip: Use good posture before bed, too. Don't crane your neck to watch TV.

 

6. Allergies Contribute to lack of Sleep. Seal Your Mattress

Sneezes, sniffles, and itchiness from allergies can lead to lousy shut-eye. Your mattress may hold the cause. Over time, it can fill with mold, dust mite droppings, and other allergy triggers. Seal your mattress, box springs, and pillows to avoid them.

Tip: Air-tight, plastic, dust-proof covers work best.

Tip:  Room purifier to decrease allergies are effective.

 

7. Save Your Bed for Sleep

Your bedroom should feel relaxing. Don’t sit in bed and work, surf the Internet, or watch TV.

 

8. Set Your Body Clock

Go to sleep and wake up at roughly the same time every day, even on weekends. This routine will get your brain and body used to being on a healthy snooze-wake schedule. In time, you'll be able to nod off quickly and rest soundly through the night.

Tip: Get out in bright light for 5 to 30 minutes as soon as you get out of bed. Light tells your body to get going!

 

9. Look for Hidden Caffeine

Coffee in the morning is fine for most people. But as soon as the clock strikes noon, avoid caffeine in foods and drinks.  Even small amounts found in chocolate can affect your Zzzz's later that night.

Tip: Read labels. Some pain relievers and weight loss pills contain caffeine.

 

10. Work Out Wisely

Regular exercise helps you sleep better -- as long as you don’t get it in too close to bedtime. A post-workout burst of energy can keep you awake. Aim to finish any vigorous exercise 3 to 4 hours before you head to bed. 

Tip: Gentle mind-body exercises, like yoga or tai chi, are great to do just before you hit the sack.

 

11. Eat Right at Night

Don’t eat heavy foods and big meals too late. They overload your digestive system, which affects how well you sleep. Have a light evening snack of cereal with milk or crackers and cheese instead.

Tip: Finish eating at least an hour before bed.

 

12. Rethink Your Drink

Alcohol can make you sleepy at bedtime, but beware. After its initial effects wear off, it will make you wake up more often overnight.

Tip: Warm milk or chamomile tea are better choices.

 

13. Watch What Time You Sip

Want to lower your odds of needing nighttime trips to the bathroom? Don’t drink anything in the last 2 hours before bed. If you have to get up at night, it can be hard to get back to sleep quickly.

Tip: Keep a nightlight in the bathroom to minimize bright light.

 

14. Lower the Lights

Dim them around your home 2 to 3 hours before bedtime. Lower light levels signal your brain to make melatonin, the hormone that brings on sleep.

Tip: Use a 15-watt bulb if you read in the last hour before bed.

 

15. Hush Noise

Faucet drips, nearby traffic, or a loud dog can chip away at your sleep. And if you're a parent, you might be all too aware of noises at night long after your children have outgrown their cribs.

Tip: Use a fan, an air-conditioner, or a white noise app or machine. You can also try ear plugs.

 

17. Beds Are for People

A cat's or a dog's night moves can cut your sleep short. They can also bring allergy triggers like fleas, fur, dander, and pollen into your bed. 

Tip: Ask your vet or animal trainer how you can teach your pet to snooze happily in its own bed.

 

18. Free Your Mind

Put aside any work, touchy discussions, or complicated decisions 2 to 3 hours before bed. It takes time to turn off the "noise" of the day. If you’ve still got a lot on your mind, jot it down and let go for the night. Then, about an hour before you hit the sack, read something calming, meditate, listen to quiet music, or take a warm bath.

Tip: Even 10 minutes of relaxation makes a difference.

 

  1. Eating Habits: 

Certain foods promote better sleep.  Check at health food stores to include the best foods and natural supplements to help promote sleep.

 

20. Know When to See Your Doctor

If you suspect sleep problems are associated with learning difficulties or ADHD, consult a pediatrician who can check to see if a health condition -- such as acid reflux, arthritis, asthma, or depression -- or a medicine your child is taking is part of the problem.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FOOD TIPS FOR SLEEP:


Wild lettuce -If you've suffered anxiety, headaches, or muscle or joint pain, you might already be familiar with wild lettuce. It's also effective at calming restlessness and reducing anxiety—and may even quell restless legs syndrome. When using a wild-lettuce supplement, take 30 to 120 milligrams before bed. (Check dosage for children)

 

Hops

Beer fans will no doubt be familiar with the calming effect of hops, the female flowers used in beer making. For sleep purposes, though, this extract has been widely used as a mild sedative for anxiety and insomnia. Take 30 to 120 milligrams before climbing under the covers. (Children dosage differs)

 

Aromatherapy

Studies have proven effective results with Lavender.  Find a spray with real lavender and spritz on pillow

 

 

Melatonin

Melatonin is the hormone that controls sleep, so it's no wonder that it naturally induces sleep. Although some experts recommend taking higher doses, studies show that lower doses are more effective. Plus, there's concern that too-high doses could cause toxicity as well as raise the risk of depression or infertility. Take 0.3 to 0.5 milligrams before bed. (Children dosage differs)

 

 

 

 

SLEEP INTERVENTIONS CAN REDUCE ADHD MEDICATIONS FOR KIDS.

 

In general, sleep deprivation is a problem among children in America. According to National Sleep Foundation's 2004 Sleep in America poll, more than two-thirds of children experience one or more sleep problems at least a few nights a week. For children with ADHD, poor sleep (too little sleep or symptoms of sleep disorders) may profoundly impact ADHD symptoms. In fact, one study found that treating sleep problems may be enough to eliminate attention and hyperactivity issues for some children. (Center sleepfoundation.org/sleep-disorders-problems/adhd-and-sleep)

Sleep problems in school children with ADHD are extremely common and strongly associated with brain function.  Relationships between mild and moderate or severe sleep problems relate back to ADHD. Studies show that moderate or severe sleep problems strongly predict symptom severity of ADHD. 

 

Studies also show that implementation of a sleep intervention could reduce the need for medication in some children.  

 

Children and adults behave differently as a result of sleepiness. Adults usually become sluggish when tired while children tend to overcompensate and speed up. For this reason, sleep deprivation is sometimes confused with ADHD in children. Children may also be moody, emotionally explosive, and/or aggressive as a result of sleepiness. In a study involving 2,463 children aged 6-15, children with sleep problems were more likely to be inattentive, hyperactive, impulsive, and display oppositional behaviors.

 

Sleep problems are also common in adults with ADHD. In one study, researchers compared adults with narcolepsy, idiopathic hypersomnia, and AHDH and found a high percentage of symptom overlap, suggesting the possibility of ADHD misdiagnosis among adults.

 

 

 

Doctors Issue Drugs Often at Parents' Request, but Experts Question Safety http://www.webmd.com/sleep-disorders/news/20030505/drugs-often-used-for-insomnia-in-kids#1 May 5, 2003

 

Providing children with drugs to help them fall asleep is common, according to a recent report -- and with no product specifically designed to treat insomnia min kids, pediatricians usually rely on antihistamines and other drugs that have sleep-producing side effects.

 

In fact, a study published in this month's issue of Pediatrics reveals that three in four pediatricians had recommended nonprescription medications for insomnia in kids in the six months prior to being surveyed, while half had written prescriptions for drugs that induce sleep.

 

And often, the survey shows, it's done for the rest or relief of the parents -- and at their request. Drugs were most often recommended or prescribed by 671 pediatricians surveyed to provide relief for weary parents -- especially in cases with children of special needs. Often the drugs were used in combination with behavioral management strategies. Other reasons in which medications were used included during travel or in children with pain.

 

"In a sense, we were surprised at how many pediatricians are recommending or prescribing drugs to treat insomnia in children -- especially for reasons like helping the child sleep while traveling," says study author Carol L. Rosen, MD, a pediatric sleep specialist at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. "But in another sense, we're not surprised because it's pediatricians who largely treat special-needs children with ADHD and autism, and sleep problems are a well-known problem in young patients with those conditions."

 

Still, she tells WebMD her study suggests that insomnia in kids is more widespread than believed, and because of that, specific guidelines are needed on how to treat it. 

 

Currently, there are no prescription sleep aids specifically designed to be used for insomnia in kids, so doctors must rely on other drugs that induce sleepiness. And medical associations such as the American Academy of Pediatrics have no policies or treatment guidelines.

 

"The medications we're using for children were never made to help children fall asleep; we're using them because of their side effects ... for their side effects," she tells WebMD. 

 

"What came out of our study is there is a real need for something specifically designed for children. There are a lot of drugs to help adults fall asleep that we know are safe and effective. But we have nothing for kids. And if we use an adult sleep aid, we don't know safe dosages." (http://www.webmd.com/add-adhd/childhood-adhd/features/reduce-side-effects-adhd-medications#1)

 

For many children, ADHD medications curb restlessness, impulsivity, and inattention well enough for them to flourish at home, school, and on the playground. But the drugs can also prompt common side effects, such as low appetite, stomach pain, or sleep problems. In rare and serious cases, they can cause heart problems, such as chest pain, liver problems, or suicidal thoughts.

 

“We do deal with both wonderful treatment response, but at the same time, medication-related side effects,” says Murat Pakyurek, an associate clinical professor at the University of California-Davis Medical Center department of psychiatry and the UC Davis M.I.N.D. Institute’s ADHD program. “The majority of the medication-related side effects are mild and temporary in nature. But there are a few side effects that are more severe and that need to be addressed immediately,” he says.

 

Set up a regular bedtime routine that includes relaxing activities, such as bathing or reading. If a stimulant type of ADHD medication prevents your child from sleeping well, ask the doctor about taking the drug earlier in the day or switching from a long-acting to a shorter-acting form . Ask, too, about reducing the dose or stopping the drug in the afternoon to help your child sleep atbedtime.

 

Daytime drowsiness: If the ADHD drug atomoxetine (Strattera) is making your child sleepy during the day, ask about giving the drug atbedtime instead of in the morning. You can also check with the doctor about lowering the dose or dividing the dose and giving it twice a day.

 

Rebounding effects: When ADHD drugs wear off in the afternoon or evening, some children have more ADHD symptoms or irritability. To prevent this “rebounding,” ask your child’s doctor about using a longer-lasting medication or taking a small dose of fast-acting stimulant later in the day.

 

 

 

20 Tips For Improving Sleep

Web MD, June 17, 2015 http://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/discomfort-15/better-sleep/slideshow-sleep-tips

 

1. Power Down

The soft blue glow from a cell phone, tablet, or digital clock on your bedside table may hurt your sleep.

Tip: Turn off TVs, computers, and other blue-light sources an hour before you go to bed. Cover any displays you can't shut off.

 

2. Nix Naps

You’ll rest better at night. But if you have to snooze while the sun's up, keep it to 20 minutes or less. Nap in the early part of the day.

Tip: Overcome an afternoon energy slump with a short walk, a glass of ice water, or a phone call with a friend.

 

3. Block Your Clock

Do you glance at it several times a night? That can make your mind race with thoughts about the day to come, which can keep you awake .

Tip: Put your alarm clock in a drawer, under your bed, or turn it away from view.

 

  1. Room Temperature - The Best Room temperature for sleep is 68-72 degrees

 

5. Put Your Neck in 'Neutral'

Blame your pillow if you wake up tired with a stiff neck. It should be just the right size -- not too fat and not too flat -- to support the natural curve of your neck when you're resting on your back. Do you sleep on your side? Line your nose up with the center of your body. Don’t snooze on your stomach. It twists your neck.

Tip: Use good posture before bed, too. Don't crane your neck to watch TV.

 

6. Allergies Contribute to lack of Sleep. Seal Your Mattress

Sneezes, sniffles, and itchiness from allergies can lead to lousy shut-eye. Your mattress may hold the cause. Over time, it can fill with mold, dust mite droppings, and other allergy triggers. Seal your mattress, box springs, and pillows to avoid them.

Tip: Air-tight, plastic, dust-proof covers work best.

Tip:  Room purifier to decrease allergies are effective.

 

7. Save Your Bed for Sleep

Your bedroom should feel relaxing. Don’t sit in bed and work, surf the Internet, or watch TV.

 

8. Set Your Body Clock

Go to sleep and wake up at roughly the same time every day, even on weekends. This routine will get your brain and body used to being on a healthy snooze-wake schedule. In time, you'll be able to nod off quickly and rest soundly through the night.

Tip: Get out in bright light for 5 to 30 minutes as soon as you get out of bed. Light tells your body to get going!

 

9. Look for Hidden Caffeine

Coffee in the morning is fine for most people. But as soon as the clock strikes noon, avoid caffeine in foods and drinks.  Even small amounts found in chocolate can affect your Zzzz's later that night.

Tip: Read labels. Some pain relievers and weight loss pills contain caffeine.

 

10. Work Out Wisely

Regular exercise helps you sleep better -- as long as you don’t get it in too close to bedtime. A post-workout burst of energy can keep you awake. Aim to finish any vigorous exercise 3 to 4 hours before you head to bed. 

Tip: Gentle mind-body exercises, like yoga or tai chi, are great to do just before you hit the sack.

 

11. Eat Right at Night

Don’t eat heavy foods and big meals too late. They overload your digestive system, which affects how well you sleep. Have a light evening snack of cereal with milk or crackers and cheese instead.

Tip: Finish eating at least an hour before bed.

 

12. Rethink Your Drink

Alcohol can make you sleepy at bedtime, but beware. After its initial effects wear off, it will make you wake up more often overnight.

Tip: Warm milk or chamomile tea are better choices.

 

13. Watch What Time You Sip

Want to lower your odds of needing nighttime trips to the bathroom? Don’t drink anything in the last 2 hours before bed. If you have to get up at night, it can be hard to get back to sleep quickly.

Tip: Keep a nightlight in the bathroom to minimize bright light.

 

14. Lower the Lights

Dim them around your home 2 to 3 hours before bedtime. Lower light levels signal your brain to make melatonin, the hormone that brings on sleep.

Tip: Use a 15-watt bulb if you read in the last hour before bed.

 

15. Hush Noise

Faucet drips, nearby traffic, or a loud dog can chip away at your sleep. And if you're a parent, you might be all too aware of noises at night long after your children have outgrown their cribs.

Tip: Use a fan, an air-conditioner, or a white noise app or machine. You can also try ear plugs.

 

17. Beds Are for People

A cat's or a dog's night moves can cut your sleep short. They can also bring allergy triggers like fleas, fur, dander, and pollen into your bed. 

Tip: Ask your vet or animal trainer how you can teach your pet to snooze happily in its own bed.

 

18. Free Your Mind

Put aside any work, touchy discussions, or complicated decisions 2 to 3 hours before bed. It takes time to turn off the "noise" of the day. If you’ve still got a lot on your mind, jot it down and let go for the night. Then, about an hour before you hit the sack, read something calming, meditate, listen to quiet music, or take a warm bath.

Tip: Even 10 minutes of relaxation makes a difference.

 

  1. Eating Habits: 

Certain foods promote better sleep.  Check at health food stores to include the best foods and natural supplements to help promote sleep.

 

20. Know When to See Your Doctor

If you suspect sleep problems are associated with learning difficulties or ADHD, consult a pediatrician who can check to see if a health condition -- such as acid reflux, arthritis, asthma, or depression -- or a medicine your child is taking is part of the problem.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FOOD TIPS FOR SLEEP:


Wild lettuce -If you've suffered anxiety, headaches, or muscle or joint pain, you might already be familiar with wild lettuce. It's also effective at calming restlessness and reducing anxiety—and may even quell restless legs syndrome. When using a wild-lettuce supplement, take 30 to 120 milligrams before bed. (Check dosage for children)

 

Hops

Beer fans will no doubt be familiar with the calming effect of hops, the female flowers used in beer making. For sleep purposes, though, this extract has been widely used as a mild sedative for anxiety and insomnia. Take 30 to 120 milligrams before climbing under the covers. (Children dosage differs)

 

Aromatherapy

Studies have proven effective results with Lavender.  Find a spray with real lavender and spritz on pillow

 

 

Melatonin

Melatonin is the hormone that controls sleep, so it's no wonder that it naturally induces sleep. Although some experts recommend taking higher doses, studies show that lower doses are more effective. Plus, there's concern that too-high doses could cause toxicity as well as raise the risk of depression or infertility. Take 0.3 to 0.5 milligrams before bed. (Children dosage differs)

 

 

 

 

SLEEP INTERVENTIONS CAN REDUCE ADHD MEDICATIONS FOR KIDS.

 

In general, sleep deprivation is a problem among children in America. According to National Sleep Foundation's 2004 Sleep in America poll, more than two-thirds of children experience one or more sleep problems at least a few nights a week. For children with ADHD, poor sleep (too little sleep or symptoms of sleep disorders) may profoundly impact ADHD symptoms. In fact, one study found that treating sleep problems may be enough to eliminate attention and hyperactivity issues for some children. (Center sleepfoundation.org/sleep-disorders-problems/adhd-and-sleep)

Sleep problems in school children with ADHD are extremely common and strongly associated with brain function.  Relationships between mild and moderate or severe sleep problems relate back to ADHD. Studies show that moderate or severe sleep problems strongly predict symptom severity of ADHD. 

 

Studies also show that implementation of a sleep intervention could reduce the need for medication in some children.  

 

Children and adults behave differently as a result of sleepiness. Adults usually become sluggish when tired while children tend to overcompensate and speed up. For this reason, sleep deprivation is sometimes confused with ADHD in children. Children may also be moody, emotionally explosive, and/or aggressive as a result of sleepiness. In a study involving 2,463 children aged 6-15, children with sleep problems were more likely to be inattentive, hyperactive, impulsive, and display oppositional behaviors.

 

Sleep problems are also common in adults with ADHD. In one study, researchers compared adults with narcolepsy, idiopathic hypersomnia, and AHDH and found a high percentage of symptom overlap, suggesting the possibility of ADHD misdiagnosis among adults.

 

 

 

Doctors Issue Drugs Often at Parents' Request, but Experts Question Safety http://www.webmd.com/sleep-disorders/news/20030505/drugs-often-used-for-insomnia-in-kids#1 May 5, 2003

 

Providing children with drugs to help them fall asleep is common, according to a recent report -- and with no product specifically designed to treat insomnia min kids, pediatricians usually rely on antihistamines and other drugs that have sleep-producing side effects.

 

In fact, a study published in this month's issue of Pediatrics reveals that three in four pediatricians had recommended nonprescription medications for insomnia in kids in the six months prior to being surveyed, while half had written prescriptions for drugs that induce sleep.

 

And often, the survey shows, it's done for the rest or relief of the parents -- and at their request. Drugs were most often recommended or prescribed by 671 pediatricians surveyed to provide relief for weary parents -- especially in cases with children of special needs. Often the drugs were used in combination with behavioral management strategies. Other reasons in which medications were used included during travel or in children with pain.

 

"In a sense, we were surprised at how many pediatricians are recommending or prescribing drugs to treat insomnia in children -- especially for reasons like helping the child sleep while traveling," says study author Carol L. Rosen, MD, a pediatric sleep specialist at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. "But in another sense, we're not surprised because it's pediatricians who largely treat special-needs children with ADHD and autism, and sleep problems are a well-known problem in young patients with those conditions."

 

Still, she tells WebMD her study suggests that insomnia in kids is more widespread than believed, and because of that, specific guidelines are needed on how to treat it. 

 

Currently, there are no prescription sleep aids specifically designed to be used for insomnia in kids, so doctors must rely on other drugs that induce sleepiness. And medical associations such as the American Academy of Pediatrics have no policies or treatment guidelines.

 

"The medications we're using for children were never made to help children fall asleep; we're using them because of their side effects ... for their side effects," she tells WebMD. 

 

"What came out of our study is there is a real need for something specifically designed for children. There are a lot of drugs to help adults fall asleep that we know are safe and effective. But we have nothing for kids. And if we use an adult sleep aid, we don't know safe dosages." (http://www.webmd.com/add-adhd/childhood-adhd/features/reduce-side-effects-adhd-medications#1)

 

For many children, ADHD medications curb restlessness, impulsivity, and inattention well enough for them to flourish at home, school, and on the playground. But the drugs can also prompt common side effects, such as low appetite, stomach pain, or sleep problems. In rare and serious cases, they can cause heart problems, such as chest pain, liver problems, or suicidal thoughts.

 

“We do deal with both wonderful treatment response, but at the same time, medication-related side effects,” says Murat Pakyurek, an associate clinical professor at the University of California-Davis Medical Center department of psychiatry and the UC Davis M.I.N.D. Institute’s ADHD program. “The majority of the medication-related side effects are mild and temporary in nature. But there are a few side effects that are more severe and that need to be addressed immediately,” he says.

 

Set up a regular bedtime routine that includes relaxing activities, such as bathing or reading. If a stimulant type of ADHD medication prevents your child from sleeping well, ask the doctor about taking the drug earlier in the day or switching from a long-acting to a shorter-acting form . Ask, too, about reducing the dose or stopping the drug in the afternoon to help your child sleep atbedtime.

 

Daytime drowsiness: If the ADHD drug atomoxetine (Strattera) is making your child sleepy during the day, ask about giving the drug atbedtime instead of in the morning. You can also check with the doctor about lowering the dose or dividing the dose and giving it twice a day.

 

Rebounding effects: When ADHD drugs wear off in the afternoon or evening, some children have more ADHD symptoms or irritability. To prevent this “rebounding,” ask your child’s doctor about using a longer-lasting medication or taking a small dose of fast-acting stimulant later in the day.

 

 

 

20 Tips For Improving Sleep

Web MD, June 17, 2015 http://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/discomfort-15/better-sleep/slideshow-sleep-tips

 

1. Power Down

The soft blue glow from a cell phone, tablet, or digital clock on your bedside table may hurt your sleep.

Tip: Turn off TVs, computers, and other blue-light sources an hour before you go to bed. Cover any displays you can't shut off.

 

2. Nix Naps

You’ll rest better at night. But if you have to snooze while the sun's up, keep it to 20 minutes or less. Nap in the early part of the day.

Tip: Overcome an afternoon energy slump with a short walk, a glass of ice water, or a phone call with a friend.

 

3. Block Your Clock

Do you glance at it several times a night? That can make your mind race with thoughts about the day to come, which can keep you awake .

Tip: Put your alarm clock in a drawer, under your bed, or turn it away from view.

 

  1. Room Temperature - The Best Room temperature for sleep is 68-72 degrees

 

5. Put Your Neck in 'Neutral'

Blame your pillow if you wake up tired with a stiff neck. It should be just the right size -- not too fat and not too flat -- to support the natural curve of your neck when you're resting on your back. Do you sleep on your side? Line your nose up with the center of your body. Don’t snooze on your stomach. It twists your neck.

Tip: Use good posture before bed, too. Don't crane your neck to watch TV.

 

6. Allergies Contribute to lack of Sleep. Seal Your Mattress

Sneezes, sniffles, and itchiness from allergies can lead to lousy shut-eye. Your mattress may hold the cause. Over time, it can fill with mold, dust mite droppings, and other allergy triggers. Seal your mattress, box springs, and pillows to avoid them.

Tip: Air-tight, plastic, dust-proof covers work best.

Tip:  Room purifier to decrease allergies are effective.

 

7. Save Your Bed for Sleep

Your bedroom should feel relaxing. Don’t sit in bed and work, surf the Internet, or watch TV.

 

8. Set Your Body Clock

Go to sleep and wake up at roughly the same time every day, even on weekends. This routine will get your brain and body used to being on a healthy snooze-wake schedule. In time, you'll be able to nod off quickly and rest soundly through the night.

Tip: Get out in bright light for 5 to 30 minutes as soon as you get out of bed. Light tells your body to get going!

 

9. Look for Hidden Caffeine

Coffee in the morning is fine for most people. But as soon as the clock strikes noon, avoid caffeine in foods and drinks.  Even small amounts found in chocolate can affect your Zzzz's later that night.

Tip: Read labels. Some pain relievers and weight loss pills contain caffeine.

 

10. Work Out Wisely

Regular exercise helps you sleep better -- as long as you don’t get it in too close to bedtime. A post-workout burst of energy can keep you awake. Aim to finish any vigorous exercise 3 to 4 hours before you head to bed. 

Tip: Gentle mind-body exercises, like yoga or tai chi, are great to do just before you hit the sack.

 

11. Eat Right at Night

Don’t eat heavy foods and big meals too late. They overload your digestive system, which affects how well you sleep. Have a light evening snack of cereal with milk or crackers and cheese instead.

Tip: Finish eating at least an hour before bed.

 

12. Rethink Your Drink

Alcohol can make you sleepy at bedtime, but beware. After its initial effects wear off, it will make you wake up more often overnight.

Tip: Warm milk or chamomile tea are better choices.

 

13. Watch What Time You Sip

Want to lower your odds of needing nighttime trips to the bathroom? Don’t drink anything in the last 2 hours before bed. If you have to get up at night, it can be hard to get back to sleep quickly.

Tip: Keep a nightlight in the bathroom to minimize bright light.

 

14. Lower the Lights

Dim them around your home 2 to 3 hours before bedtime. Lower light levels signal your brain to make melatonin, the hormone that brings on sleep.

Tip: Use a 15-watt bulb if you read in the last hour before bed.

 

15. Hush Noise

Faucet drips, nearby traffic, or a loud dog can chip away at your sleep. And if you're a parent, you might be all too aware of noises at night long after your children have outgrown their cribs.

Tip: Use a fan, an air-conditioner, or a white noise app or machine. You can also try ear plugs.

 

17. Beds Are for People

A cat's or a dog's night moves can cut your sleep short. They can also bring allergy triggers like fleas, fur, dander, and pollen into your bed. 

Tip: Ask your vet or animal trainer how you can teach your pet to snooze happily in its own bed.

 

18. Free Your Mind

Put aside any work, touchy discussions, or complicated decisions 2 to 3 hours before bed. It takes time to turn off the "noise" of the day. If you’ve still got a lot on your mind, jot it down and let go for the night. Then, about an hour before you hit the sack, read something calming, meditate, listen to quiet music, or take a warm bath.

Tip: Even 10 minutes of relaxation makes a difference.

 

  1. Eating Habits: 

Certain foods promote better sleep.  Check at health food stores to include the best foods and natural supplements to help promote sleep.

 

20. Know When to See Your Doctor

If you suspect sleep problems are associated with learning difficulties or ADHD, consult a pediatrician who can check to see if a health condition -- such as acid reflux, arthritis, asthma, or depression -- or a medicine your child is taking is part of the problem.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FOOD TIPS FOR SLEEP:


Wild lettuce -If you've suffered anxiety, headaches, or muscle or joint pain, you might already be familiar with wild lettuce. It's also effective at calming restlessness and reducing anxiety—and may even quell restless legs syndrome. When using a wild-lettuce supplement, take 30 to 120 milligrams before bed. (Check dosage for children)

 

Hops

Beer fans will no doubt be familiar with the calming effect of hops, the female flowers used in beer making. For sleep purposes, though, this extract has been widely used as a mild sedative for anxiety and insomnia. Take 30 to 120 milligrams before climbing under the covers. (Children dosage differs)

 

Aromatherapy

Studies have proven effective results with Lavender.  Find a spray with real lavender and spritz on pillow

 

 

Melatonin

Melatonin is the hormone that controls sleep, so it's no wonder that it naturally induces sleep. Although some experts recommend taking higher doses, studies show that lower doses are more effective. Plus, there's concern that too-high doses could cause toxicity as well as raise the risk of depression or infertility. Take 0.3 to 0.5 milligrams before bed. (Children dosage differs)

 

 

 

 

 

SLEEP INTERVENTIONS CAN REDUCE ADHD MEDICATIONS FOR KIDS.

In general, sleep deprivation is a problem among children in America. According to National Sleep Foundation's 2004 Sleep in America poll, more than two-thirds of children experience one or more sleep problems at least a few nights a week. For children with ADHD, poor sleep (too little sleep or symptoms of sleep disorders) may profoundly impact ADHD symptoms. In fact, one study found that treating sleep problems may be enough to eliminate attention and hyperactivity issues for some children. (Center sleepfoundation.org/sleep-disorders-problems/adhd-and-sleep)
Sleep problems in school children with ADHD are extremely common and strongly associated with brain function.  Relationships between mild and moderate or severe sleep problems relate back to ADHD. Studies show that moderate or severe sleep problems strongly predict symptom severity of ADHD. 

Studies also show that implementation of a sleep intervention could reduce the need for medication in some children.  

Children and adults behave differently as a result of sleepiness. Adults usually become sluggish when tired while children tend to overcompensate and speed up. For this reason, sleep deprivation is sometimes confused with ADHD in children. Children may also be moody, emotionally explosive, and/or aggressive as a result of sleepiness. In a study involving 2,463 children aged 6-15, children with sleep problems were more likely to be inattentive, hyperactive, impulsive, and display oppositional behaviors.

Sleep problems are also common in adults with ADHD. In one study, researchers compared adults with narcolepsy, idiopathic hypersomnia, and AHDH and found a high percentage of symptom overlap, suggesting the possibility of ADHD misdiagnosis among adults.

 

Doctors Issue Drugs Often at Parents' Request, but Experts Question Safety http://www.webmd.com/sleep-disorders/news/20030505/drugs-often-used-for-insomnia-in-kids#1 May 5, 2003

Providing children with drugs to help them fall asleep is common, according to a recent report -- and with no product specifically designed to treat insomnia min kids, pediatricians usually rely on antihistamines and other drugs that have sleep-producing side effects.

In fact, a study published in this month's issue of Pediatrics reveals that three in four pediatricians had recommended nonprescription medications for insomnia in kids in the six months prior to being surveyed, while half had written prescriptions for drugs that induce sleep.

And often, the survey shows, it's done for the rest or relief of the parents -- and at their request. Drugs were most often recommended or prescribed by 671 pediatricians surveyed to provide relief for weary parents -- especially in cases with children of special needs. Often the drugs were used in combination with behavioral management strategies. Other reasons in which medications were used included during travel or in children with pain.

"In a sense, we were surprised at how many pediatricians are recommending or prescribing drugs to treat insomnia in children -- especially for reasons like helping the child sleep while traveling," says study author Carol L. Rosen, MD, a pediatric sleep specialist at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. "But in another sense, we're not surprised because it's pediatricians who largely treat special-needs children with ADHD and autism, and sleep problems are a well-known problem in young patients with those conditions."

Still, she tells WebMD her study suggests that insomnia in kids is more widespread than believed, and because of that, specific guidelines are needed on how to treat it. 

Currently, there are no prescription sleep aids specifically designed to be used for insomnia in kids, so doctors must rely on other drugs that induce sleepiness. And medical associations such as the American Academy of Pediatrics have no policies or treatment guidelines.

"The medications we're using for children were never made to help children fall asleep; we're using them because of their side effects ... for their side effects," she tells WebMD. 

"What came out of our study is there is a real need for something specifically designed for children. There are a lot of drugs to help adults fall asleep that we know are safe and effective. But we have nothing for kids. And if we use an adult sleep aid, we don't know safe dosages." (http://www.webmd.com/add-adhd/childhood-adhd/features/reduce-side-effects-adhd-medications#1)

For many children, ADHD medications curb restlessness, impulsivity, and inattention well enough for them to flourish at home, school, and on the playground. But the drugs can also prompt common side effects, such as low appetite, stomach pain, or sleep problems. In rare and serious cases, they can cause heart problems, such as chest pain, liver problems, or suicidal thoughts.

“We do deal with both wonderful treatment response, but at the same time, medication-related side effects,” says Murat Pakyurek, an associate clinical professor at the University of California-Davis Medical Center department of psychiatry and the UC Davis M.I.N.D. Institute’s ADHD program. “The majority of the medication-related side effects are mild and temporary in nature. But there are a few side effects that are more severe and that need to be addressed immediately,” he says.

Set up a regular bedtime routine that includes relaxing activities, such as bathing or reading. If a stimulant type of ADHD medication prevents your child from sleeping well, ask the doctor about taking the drug earlier in the day or switching from a long-acting to a shorter-acting form . Ask, too, about reducing the dose or stopping the drug in the afternoon to help your child sleep atbedtime.

Daytime drowsiness: If the ADHD drug atomoxetine (Strattera) is making your child sleepy during the day, ask about giving the drug atbedtime instead of in the morning. You can also check with the doctor about lowering the dose or dividing the dose and giving it twice a day.

Rebounding effects: When ADHD drugs wear off in the afternoon or evening, some children have more ADHD symptoms or irritability. To prevent this “rebounding,” ask your child’s doctor about using a longer-lasting medication or taking a small dose of fast-acting stimulant later in the day.

 

20 Tips For Improving Sleep
Web MD, June 17, 2015 http://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/discomfort-15/better-sleep/slideshow-sleep-tips

1. Power Down
The soft blue glow from a cell phone, tablet, or digital clock on your bedside table may hurt your sleep.
Tip: Turn off TVs, computers, and other blue-light sources an hour before you go to bed. Cover any displays you can't shut off.

2. Nix Naps
You’ll rest better at night. But if you have to snooze while the sun's up, keep it to 20 minutes or less. Nap in the early part of the day.
Tip: Overcome an afternoon energy slump with a short walk, a glass of ice water, or a phone call with a friend.

3. Block Your Clock
Do you glance at it several times a night? That can make your mind race with thoughts about the day to come, which can keep you awake .
Tip: Put your alarm clock in a drawer, under your bed, or turn it away from view.

 Room Temperature - The Best Room temperature for sleep is 68-72 degrees

5. Put Your Neck in 'Neutral'
Blame your pillow if you wake up tired with a stiff neck. It should be just the right size -- not too fat and not too flat -- to support the natural curve of your neck when you're resting on your back. Do you sleep on your side? Line your nose up with the center of your body. Don’t snooze on your stomach. It twists your neck.
Tip: Use good posture before bed, too. Don't crane your neck to watch TV.

6. Allergies Contribute to lack of Sleep. Seal Your Mattress
Sneezes, sniffles, and itchiness from allergies can lead to lousy shut-eye. Your mattress may hold the cause. Over time, it can fill with mold, dust mite droppings, and other allergy triggers. Seal your mattress, box springs, and pillows to avoid them.
Tip: Air-tight, plastic, dust-proof covers work best.
Tip:  Room purifier to decrease allergies are effective.

7. Save Your Bed for Sleep
Your bedroom should feel relaxing. Don’t sit in bed and work, surf the Internet, or watch TV.

8. Set Your Body Clock
Go to sleep and wake up at roughly the same time every day, even on weekends. This routine will get your brain and body used to being on a healthy snooze-wake schedule. In time, you'll be able to nod off quickly and rest soundly through the night.
Tip: Get out in bright light for 5 to 30 minutes as soon as you get out of bed. Light tells your body to get going!

9. Look for Hidden Caffeine
Coffee in the morning is fine for most people. But as soon as the clock strikes noon, avoid caffeine in foods and drinks.  Even small amounts found in chocolate can affect your Zzzz's later that night.
Tip: Read labels. Some pain relievers and weight loss pills contain caffeine.

10. Work Out Wisely
Regular exercise helps you sleep better -- as long as you don’t get it in too close to bedtime. A post-workout burst of energy can keep you awake. Aim to finish any vigorous exercise 3 to 4 hours before you head to bed. 
Tip: Gentle mind-body exercises, like yoga or tai chi, are great to do just before you hit the sack.

11. Eat Right at Night
Don’t eat heavy foods and big meals too late. They overload your digestive system, which affects how well you sleep. Have a light evening snack of cereal with milk or crackers and cheese instead.
Tip: Finish eating at least an hour before bed.

12. Rethink Your Drink
Alcohol can make you sleepy at bedtime, but beware. After its initial effects wear off, it will make you wake up more often overnight.
Tip: Warm milk or chamomile tea are better choices.

13. Watch What Time You Sip
Want to lower your odds of needing nighttime trips to the bathroom? Don’t drink anything in the last 2 hours before bed. If you have to get up at night, it can be hard to get back to sleep quickly.
Tip: Keep a nightlight in the bathroom to minimize bright light.

14. Lower the Lights
Dim them around your home 2 to 3 hours before bedtime. Lower light levels signal your brain to make melatonin, the hormone that brings on sleep.
Tip: Use a 15-watt bulb if you read in the last hour before bed.

15. Hush Noise
Faucet drips, nearby traffic, or a loud dog can chip away at your sleep. And if you're a parent, you might be all too aware of noises at night long after your children have outgrown their cribs.
Tip: Use a fan, an air-conditioner, or a white noise app or machine. You can also try ear plugs.

17. Beds Are for People
A cat's or a dog's night moves can cut your sleep short. They can also bring allergy triggers like fleas, fur, dander, and pollen into your bed. 
Tip: Ask your vet or animal trainer how you can teach your pet to snooze happily in its own bed.

18. Free Your Mind
Put aside any work, touchy discussions, or complicated decisions 2 to 3 hours before bed. It takes time to turn off the "noise" of the day. If you’ve still got a lot on your mind, jot it down and let go for the night. Then, about an hour before you hit the sack, read something calming, meditate, listen to quiet music, or take a warm bath.
Tip: Even 10 minutes of relaxation makes a difference.

 Eating Habits: 
Certain foods promote better sleep.  Check at health food stores to include the best foods and natural supplements to help promote sleep.

20. Know When to See Your Doctor
If you suspect sleep problems are associated with learning difficulties or ADHD, consult a pediatrician who can check to see if a health condition -- such as acid reflux, arthritis, asthma, or depression -- or a medicine your child is taking is part of the problem.

 

 

 

FOOD TIPS FOR SLEEP:
Wild lettuce -If you've suffered anxiety, headaches, or muscle or joint pain, you might already be familiar with wild lettuce. It's also effective at calming restlessness and reducing anxiety—and may even quell restless legs syndrome. When using a wild-lettuce supplement, take 30 to 120 milligrams before bed. (Check dosage for children)

Hops
Beer fans will no doubt be familiar with the calming effect of hops, the female flowers used in beer making. For sleep purposes, though, this extract has been widely used as a mild sedative for anxiety and insomnia. Take 30 to 120 milligrams before climbing under the covers. (Children dosage differs)

Aromatherapy
Studies have proven effective results with Lavender.  Find a spray with real lavender and spritz on pillow


Melatonin
Melatonin is the hormone that controls sleep, so it's no wonder that it naturally induces sleep. Although some experts recommend taking higher doses, studies show that lower doses are more effective. Plus, there's concern that too-high doses could cause toxicity as well as raise the risk of depression or infertility. Take 0.3 to 0.5 milligrams before bed. (Children dosage differs)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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The Society of Magnificent Minds goes to Harvard to study Art Integration as a curriculum change for Dyslexic Students.

The Society of Magnificent Minds seeks and searches for top-tier resources and information that improves curriculum for students with Dyslexia. We went to the top, Harvard Graduate School of Education, Boston, and Integrated Arts Academy Magnate School in Vermont, to learn about a hot topic in education, Arts Integration. Our research and fact-finding trip has led to knowledge, proven performance and an innovative way to look at standard curriculum for students with Dyslexia. 

Our service is to search and bring to our School and Teacher clients, proven methods that are making positive educational impact for visual learners. Arts Integration is a method that strongly correlates with success when it comes to curriculum reform for Dyslexic Minds. Arts Integration, however, is not a limited tool for Dyslexic reform, it actually improves performance for all students across the board and requires little expense since all schools are equipped to implement a program - an art teacher collaborating with great teachers willing to push the program to achieve better education overall. The results are tremendous at the Arts Integrated Academy. IEP students are improving performance on overall subjects gaining 20% or better in grade performance. 

Motivation and deep understanding of subject matter is evident across the board for all students, and teacher turnaround is diminishing. There is new strength, motivation and excitement on both teacher and student levels, the halls are buzzing, and the vibe is catching, in this magnate school, The Arts Integrated Academy, located in Burlington Vermont. The research shows that Arts Integration is a method of relieving student fear and anxiety, identifying individual student strengths, pulling out thoughts and ideas, improving communication, and improving teacher involvement, all components that achieve better results in education overall. Where rote education fails for students with Learning Disabilities, Art Integration succeeds. 

Arts Integration is not about making artists of all students. Art Integration is simply using art to layer into standard curriculum, taking subjects and classroom experience to a higher level, communicating information in a more lasting, more memorable format. 

Movement and sound also play a role in Arts Integration. Theatre, computer technology as well as music are also major pieces in the Arts Integration Program, pieces that when put together, bring education to a higher level and standard- which is showcased on every wall, in every classroom, in every subject, in every medium - at the Art Integration Academy. 

Our School 60 Day Action Plan of Success includes Art Integration as a proven method to gain a gold standard education. 

We can guide School Administrators on how to use the strategies, gain understanding, interviews and knowledge to help teachers learn to use Art Integration to empower education for Dyslexic Minds. 

For Parent Clients, Our Individual Consulting and One on One Action Plan of Success, uses the Arts Integration program as a strategy on IEP and curriculum development. Every student is different. We individualize IEP's to fit individual strength. Register for free and receive 15 Better Ways to Educate Dyslexic Minds. Purchase one hour of consultation and find out how we work Art Integration for Dyslexic Educational Reform into individual IEP development to improve your child's academic performance by 20%.